Japanese researchers move small objects using sound waves

5 years ago by in Technology

Japanese scientists have managed to move small objects in a 3D environment by using a complex system of ultrasonic waves that have created an acoustic levitation.

In order to move expanded polystyrene particles of 0.6 mm and 2 mm in diameter, the Japanese scientists at the University of Tokyo and the Nagoya Institute of Technology had to place the objects inside a complex set-up of four arrays of speakers, according to the international press.

Using the sound waves, several bubbles, a screw and a tiny piece of wood were airlifted and moved around in all direction.

“We considered extended acoustic manipulation whereby millimeter-sized particles were levitated and moved three-dimensionally by localized ultrasonic standing waves, which were generated by ultrasonic phased arrays,” the study stated.

The equipment used during the experiment includes audio speakers capable generating inaudible high frequencies sound waves that intersect inside a restrained space. The waves then generate a “moveable ultrasonic focal point,” frequency noise greater than 20kHz, where crossover creates standing waves. Some waves are kept in the same position, serving as a suspending force, while other waves are used to support a floating object jammed in the standing waves.

“Our manipulation system has two original features. One is the direction of the ultrasound beam, which is arbitrary because the force acting toward its center is also utilized. The other is the manipulation principle by which a localized standing wave is generated at an arbitrary position and moved three-dimensionally by opposed and ultrasonic phased arrays,” the study said.

“The essence of levitation technology is the countervailing of gravity. It is known that an ultrasound standing wave is capable of suspending small particles at its sound pressure nodes,” Yoichi Ochiai from University of Tokyo said.

The demonstration of the experiment can be seen here.