Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s new mandate does not guarantee reform

6 years ago by in Politics

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe might win a mandate at Sunday’s elections, but this is hardly a guarantee for a “Big Bang” reform for Japan, according to analysts.

Abe’s Liberal Democratic Party-led bloc is expected to win Sunday’s upper house elections in Japan, as media surveys showed that the Prime Minister’s party is leading the polls. Abe took the Prime Minister office for the second time in December and started a series of reforms designed to boost the country’s economy.

“What’s required is the kind of thorough-going reform that Mr. Abe doesn’t seem to have the vision or stomach for,” said Jun Okumura, a senior advisor for Eurasia Group and former bureaucrat at Japan’s trade and industry ministry, quoted by the international media.

“Just because he wins an election doesn’t mean vested interests will be any more amenable to changes that would affect them negatively”, he added.

“Just because he wins an election doesn’t mean vested interests will be any more amenable to changes that would affect them negatively,” he said. “A leader can do a lot with the ability to appoint and dismiss cabinet members and ultimately, the right to call a general election. But I don’t see Mr. Abe as that kind of leader”, said Okumura.

The analysts forecast a tough mandate for Abe, who has to deal with hard reform measures in all fields.